Call it the other state history.

The part of West Virginia’s past that didn’t get much attention, until recently.

That may be changing, however, as the national debate heats up about confederate monuments’ fate.

Although most people may not know it, there are dozens of them scattered throughout the state.

Author Milton W. Humphreys, who wrote “After the Civil War,” lists these sites, county by county:

 

Hampshire County’s Indian Mound Cemetery is home to the first of these monuments to be erected after the Civil War.

Wikipedia

Wikipedia

It was dedicated Sept. 26, 1867.

West Virginia left Virginia and became a state on June 20, 1863, because of the Civil War.

Also known as The War Between the States, it was fought from 1861-1865.

Historians estimate  between 22,000 and 25,000 West Virginians fought for the Union.

Approximately 9,000 state men chose to fight for the South and joined the confederate regiments of Virginia.

Virginia’s 22nd Infantry was composed almost entirely of soldiers from West Virginia, according to the FamilySearch website.

So it’s not surprising there are reminders of the war’s bloodshed across the state.

Confederate monuments, memorials and grave can still be found in 20 counties: Berkeley, Cabell, Fayette, Greenbrier, Hampshire, Hardy, Harrison, Jefferson, Kanawha, Logan, Marion, Mason, Mercer, Monroe, Pendleton, Pocahontas, Putnam, Randolph, Summers, and Wood.

Counties that are home to the most confederate monuments and memorials include:

JEFFERSON COUNTY:

Boyd B. Stutler Collection, West Virginia State Archives

Boyd B. Stutler Collection, West Virginia State Archives

Hayward Shepherd Monument, Harpers Ferry, erected in 1931 by Daughters of the Confederacy and Sons of Confederate Veterans. Shepherd was an African American who died after being wounded on Oct. 16, 1859, by John Brown’s raiders as he was working on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.

Curt Mason, Jefferson County Historic Landmarks Commission

Curt Mason, Jefferson County Historic Landmarks Commission

A series of 25 concrete obelisks were placed throughout Jefferson County in 1910 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Civil War. They also marked spots were skirmishes or battles took place, and were erected by the United Confederate Veterans.

An obelisk is a tall, four-sided, narrow tapering monument that has a pyramid-like shape on top. The Washington Monument in Washington, D.C., is an example of this design.

4386959248_195faec4fc_o

Flickr

Obelisk at Charles Town’s Edge Hill Cemetery was dedicated in 1871 memorializing soldiers killed in the Battle of Cameron’s Depot, 1864. There are 184 confederate graves in the cemetery’s military section.

Nanpitt, Historical Marker Project

Nanpitt, Historical Marker Project

Shepherdstown’s Elmwood Cemetery dates back to 1780, but the Southern Soldiers’ Memorial Association formally purchased land adjacent to the original grounds. The additional land was intended as a final resting spot for confederate soldiers who were either killed at the Battle of Sharpsburg or died from wounds received there. A total of 114 men, many unknown, are interred here. It was officially dedicated on Confederate Memorial Day June 5, 1869. In 1935, the Confederate Soldiers Monument and regimental roster were erected. This concrete monument lists 535 area men who served in the Confederate Army.

GREENBRIER:

Roger Miller, The Historical Marker Database

Roger Miller, The Historical Marker Database

Blue Sulphur Springs, stone for unknown Georgia soldiers who died during the winter of 1863.

Trekity

Trekity

White Sulphur Springs, Greenbrier Resort, stone for soldiers. The resort had been used as a hospital during the Civil War.

WVU, West Virginia and Regional History Center

WVU, West Virginia and Regional History Center

Lewisburg, Greenbrier County Library, standing Confederate soldier with inscription “In memory of our Confederate dead.”

Pinterest

Pinterest

Lewisburg, stone for 95 unknown soldiers killed in the Battle of Lewisburg and in the Battle of Droop Mountain. The mass grave is in the shape of a cross, about 3 feet high, the two arms stretch 53 feet and 80 feet. There are also four other commemorative monuments on the site.

Eric Wittenberg , Rantings of a Civil War Historian

Eric Wittenberg , Rantings of a Civil War Historian

Lewisburg, large stone erected by survivors of the Battle of Dry Creek in memory of Lt. John Gay Carr, Co. H, 22nd Regiment Virginia Volunteer Infantry, Kanawha Rifleman, killed Aug. 26, 1861.

KANAWHA:

Pinterest

Pinterest

Charleston, Spy Memorial. There are two conflicting stories about which side executed the two women as spies.

Red.Ochre, City-Data

Red.Ochre, City-Data

Charleston, Ruffner Memorial Park, memorial to the Kanawha Riflemen.

Chuck & Alice Riecks, Flickr

Chuck & Alice Riecks, Flickr

Charleston, standing statue of Gen. Stonewall Jackson on the state Capitol grounds.

Dick 'n Debbie's Travels

Dick ‘n Debbie’s Travels

Charleston, bust of Gen. Stonewall Jackson, located in the rotunda of the Capitol building. This bust is the same as the one located in Virginia’s Capitol building.

 

 

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